BLOG

By Donna Clayton 20 Apr, 2017

They may have started as the industry underdogs, but ‘independent’ brewers Brewdog have built their empire from the heavy duty resin flooring up to be now worth upwards of £1 billion.

The brand’s roots grew from a perspective of the outsider of the brewery industry, choosing its signature brew names such as ‘Punk’ as a sign of defiance against the mainstream brewers, and after a hugely successful crowdfunding campaign which raised $102 million in the US, the brand began to blossom into the beers you can find stocked in almost every supermarket and the specialty pubs in every major city in the UK.

With the initial backers of the brand the very people who were drinking it, now, a major investment company have just bought a 22 per cent stake in the company, according to insider.co.uk , worth £213 million. That gives the business a value just topping £1 billion and is thought to have netted the co-founders £100 million in profit in the process.

For those initial backers, their original stakes in the business have not been diluted as such, and indeed are worth an astronomical amount more than when they bought them. In some cases, this has meant growth in the value of their shares by 2,700%.

Despite their success, the brand has been criticised for being a ‘corporate sellout’ - especially given the concept it sold to its original backers, leaving it in a somewhat uncomfortable position.

One of the founders, James Watt, told the BBC that the shift in ownership wouldn’t affect the brand’s core values : "Our appeal to drinkers isn't about scale, it's about passion and values. It's about living or dying by what goes in to every glass or bottle,” he said.

However, the brand has also been dogged by some other bad press, which have been decidedly less punk than their signature virtues would suggest of them. They had previously taken legal action against small pubs who had names that slightly infringed on their own brew names, as well as against one for a vodka drink it had yet to launch. It even challenged a bar which wanted to call itself ‘Draft Punk’, saying that it wanted intellectual property rights over the word ‘Punk’ in relation to beer.

Protecting the brand will undoubtedly be important for them, especially with copycats from more traditionally corporate brewers looking to emulate their successes, however, for its loyal followers, these were not the actions they wanted to see.

It’s a question which may crop up for any microbrewery who experiences success in the craft beer market. Buyers are purchasing not only a taste of your beer, but also the story of it - where it was made, the people it was made by and the values attached to it. Of course, when that initial situation changes, you may not be able to deliver this and still make your brewing a commercial business.

After all, that pretty new resin screed flooring isn’t going to pay for itself, is it?

By Donna Clayton 18 Apr, 2017

Tesco has announced a significant expansion of its craft beer range, including a sour beer - Tart Bakewell Beer from the Thornbridge brewery in Derbyshire.

And the supermarket giant has highlighted this particular tipple as the next big thing in the beer and ale sector.

Speaking about the growth in the retailer’s craft beer range, Tesco craft beer buyer Chloe Harrison revealed that sour beer is expected to become increasingly popular.

“We think sour brews are destined to become the next frontier for beer lovers, in the same way that golden ale helped convert diehard lager lovers over to light and refreshing ales,” she asserted. 

Ms Harrison added that there’s no sign that the craft beer trend in the UK is slowing down either, with the brews on offer appealing to such a wide demographic.

More than 70 lines of craft beer from all around the world will soon be made available in Tesco’s UK stores - an increase of almost one-third on the current range. 

If the supermarket giant is right, could we see more breweries experimenting with sour beers, or will it lead to a new wave of craft breweries being established around the country to provide this alternative tipple?

Sour beer is most commonly associated with Belgium and is brewed to have an intentionally tart or sour flavour. Earlier this year, the Independent picked out the ten best sour beers on the market, with just one - Siren, Calypso - coming from a UK-based brewer. 

If you’re looking at establishing your own brewery, make sure you set it up properly from the ground up with durable resin flooring. Contact us today to find out how we can help .

 

By Donna Clayton 13 Apr, 2017


Yorkshire’s Ossett Brewery is set for a significant expansion as the craft beer market continues to boom in the UK.

The brewery, which has been running since 1997, has already expanded once when it outgrew its original facility and moved to where it’s currently situated in Kings Yard.

However, now the popularity of its brews such as Excelsior and Silver King means the brewing company is ready to grow again. This time it will involve building a new cold storage warehouse, with a floor space of 12,000 sq ft.

The aim is to enable the brewery to move into packaged products as well as continuing to produce its popular range of cask beers.

Work on the new warehouse has already started and will no doubt involve laying resin flooring to provide a durable and safe working space .

It is set to open by the end of the year and Ossett Brewery will be recruiting new staff to help it expand its business. An additional 40 roles are set to be created over the coming three years, the brewery revealed.

There doesn’t seem to be any sign that the craft beer market in the UK is going to shrink. Last month research conducted by The Brewers Journal and Alltech found that the country has the most craft breweries per capita in the world.

According to the survey, there are 25 craft breweries per million people in the UK, compared to 16 in Germany and 15 in the US. That said, the US still wins on sheer numbers, boasting 4,750 craft breweries throughout the country.


By Donna Clayton 25 Mar, 2017

A Stockton microbrewery that is approaching its first birthday has revealed that business is booming.

Speaking to the Gazette Live , the founders behind the Three Brothers Brewing Company said that they now produce over 7,500 pints a week at their site off Bowesfield Lane.

As well as brewing their ‘core’ ales, they also offer custom-brews for pubs and parties. People can have their own tipple for as little as £65 plus VAT per cask. Those who order a custom-brew can come to the brewery to sample it before taking delivery.

The business was the brainchild of Kitt Dodd, who had tried home brewing and caught the bug. He convinced his brother David to join him in the venture, while brother-in-law Chris Wright also came onboard to round off their skills and expertise in all things beer.

They set up their brewery in a former car showroom and have completely transformed the space. No doubt one of the first things to go down in the transformation was the resin flooring, followed by the brewing equipment, much of which was custom-made based on David’s requirements.

“It’s not been an easy road, but it’s been good. As an engineer I love challenges and we’ve had our fair share. But with every challenge comes a new solution and you don’t have that problem again,” David explained.

He added that his brother likes to experiment and enjoys the “weird and wonderful”. Among his current trials are honey beer and fruit beers.

The first ale the Three Brothers Brewery produced was a five per cent proof golden ale, named Brew Number 1. They were slightly concerned that it might be hard to sell to pubs, because some landlords can shy away from stronger ales due to one pint being too strong to drive after.

However, they’ve had no problems because customers have loved the beer so much. From this starting point, they’ve continued to thrive and are planning to expand.

Of course, any brewery, large or small, needs to be mindful of safety. This covers not only employees, but also any visitors who might come onsite. In the case of the Three Brothers Brewery, that can include customers who are buying one of their custom-brews.

Making sure people know where they are and aren’t allowed to walk when in a brewery is important, so having some kind of markings on the resin flooring is sensible to ensure people stick to designated safe areas.

It’s not only Stockton where the microbrewery sector is booming. There are new breweries popping up all over the UK and Colyton in East Devon could be the next spot to boast its own craft brewery.

Plans have been submitted to East Devon District Council to change an industrial unit that was formerly a bike and motorbike shop into a microbrewery, with a supporting shop and tap room, View News reported.

Musbury-based Darkplace Brewery is behind the venture and in its planning application stated that the region’s tourism industry could be strengthened by “nurturing a craft beer community”.


By Donna Clayton 21 Mar, 2017


It’s no secret that craft breweries have become increasingly popular in the UK, but a new survey shows that we have the most craft breweries per capita of any country in the world.

Research carried out by The Brewers Journal and Alltech found that the UK has 25 craft breweries per million people.

To put that in perspective, Germany has 16 and the US has 15. Despite having the most breweries for our population size, the US is still the largest craft brewing market in the globe. It boasts 4,750 craft breweries.

Editor of The Brewers Journal Tim Sheahan said that the UK and US have both paved the way for craft breweries to develop through legislation. He cited President Jimmy Carter’s decision to allow home brewing in the US for the first time since prohibition as the pivotal moment in the States.

In the UK, it was legislation of a different kind that paved the way for craft breweries to really take off though. “The UK’s watershed moment came in 2002 with prime minister Gordon Brown’s progressive beer duty legislation that reduced beer duty to nil for breweries producing less than 5,000 hectolitres,” Mr Sheahan explained.

For the purposes of the Alltech and The Brewers Journal survey, a craft brewery was classed as any business that employed fewer than 30 staff, brewed less than 5,000 hectolitres a year, or where more than 50 per cent of the brewery was privately owned.

The global picture for craft brewing appears to be a healthy one. Of the more than 19,000 breweries around the world 17,732 fall into the craft brewery category.

Both the UK and US have been experiencing ten per cent year-on-year growth in the number of craft breweries opening, and interest in the sector doesn’t seem to be diminishing among consumers.

Even though we’re only in March, there have already been a number of new breweries announced this year . Among them are plans to turn an old angling centre at Swansea’s Pilot House Wharf into a microbrewery with a craft beer pub above it.

The South Wales Evening Post revealed that couple Richard and Jo Bennett, who already run a pub and microbrewery in the Mumbles, have taken it on as their new project.

Elsewhere in the UK, plans have been submitted to turn a disused farm building into a microbrewery . Earlier this month two friends revealed that they want to turn an old dairy building on a farm in Wiltshire into a brewery where they will produce craft beers using predominantly locally sourced ingredients.

It’s fantastic that old buildings are finding a new lease of life as breweries, but anyone setting up this kind of business will need to make sure they fit the premises out properly to make it suitable for this use.

Ensuring that heavy duty resin flooring is fitted is just as important a part of the process as sourcing the right kinds of vats and brewing equipment needed to produced delicious craft beers.

By Donna Clayton 20 Mar, 2017

The ecommerce and retail sectors are one of the driving forces behind the growing demand for large-scale warehouse space in the UK.

This is according to the latest research carried out by CBRE examining the country’s ‘big box’ warehousing sector. This specifically refers to any warehouse space that is 10,000 sq ft and over in size.

In its industrial and logistics monthly snapshot, the company revealed that over 50 per cent of the warehousing space currently let is split between ecommerce and retail businesses.

Warehouse space in the East and West Midlands, as well as the South East of England is in strong demand. There are significant schemes being developed in all of these areas to help meet demand, CBRE found.

Therefore, there will no doubt be demand for heavy-duty resin flooring to be installed in these spaces as they get ready to operate as warehouses for a range of sectors .

Jonathan Compton, CBRE industrial and logistics, business development, highlighted the resilience of the industrial and logistics sector within the UK.

“The past year has been a record in terms of occupier demand for modern warehousing,” he asserted.

Meanwhile, research conducted recently by Savills revealed that technology is likely to change the way warehousing space operates, and indeed could alter how it’s developed going forward.

In its latest report on the sector, the organisation noted that the growing use of robotics in warehouses could enable them to get taller as the racking process becomes more efficient. The warehouses themselves could also be relocated thanks to alternative delivery options utilising the likes of drones, the real estate experts suggested.


By Donna Clayton 11 Mar, 2017

 

Two men want to convert an unused dairy building into a microbrewery. The site on a farm near Devizes in Wiltshire will be developed in keeping with the rest of the property but will offer a very different kind of produce.

The Gazette & Herald reported that Glen Upward and Aistis Nefas have applied for planning permission from Wiltshire Council to carry out the necessary work to start their business.

In the application, Mr Upward explained that they are only looking to brew on a small scale, and will use locally sourced ingredients, products and services as far as possible.

He added: “It is my vision to eventually use grain from the farm in the beer, and give spent grain and yeast back to the farm to feed the cows and pigs.”

The pair have named their business Gunslinger Ales and will likely have a lot of work to do to make the old dairy building suitable for use as a brewery, including installing all the right equipment and laying heavy duty resin flooring.

Microbreweries have been growing in popularity in the UK, with craft beers and ciders proving popular among consumers.

At the recent Taste of Dorset Awards, Wimborne-based microbrewery The Brew Shack took home the award for Best Brewery, the Blackmore Vale reported.

Adam Bascombe runs the brewery on his own, producing traditional cask and bottled ales, as well as seasonal specials.

“We don’t do novelty beers, we produce a range of well-balanced, consistent, high-quality beer using the best ingredients available,” he told the newspaper.


By Donna Clayton 05 Mar, 2017

Ardgowan, in Scotland’s lowlands, is set to get a new distillery with plans approved by Inverclyde Council to construct a £12 million distillery and visitor centre at the Ardgowan Estate.

The Drink Business reported that the Ardgowan Distillery is expected to be operational by 2019. Scotland is well-known for the production of world-class single malt whiskies and this will be no exception.

Martin McAdam, the distillery’s chief executive, told the news provider that they plan to produce a seven-year-old lowland single malt, making use of the “tremendous heritage and natural resources” in the local area.

“In the coming weeks we will commence detailed design and procurement work for the construction of the distillery,” Mr McAdam explained.

He added that this will be the ideal opportunity to begin engaging with the public and local businesses on the proposals. They intend to employ local staff where possible, he added, noting that they will create jobs during the construction phase, as well as once the distillery is operational.

Part of the building process will involve choosing the right type of flooring for the distillery, with safety no doubt a paramount concern.

Using food industry flooring will ensure that it’s not only non-slip and resilient to spillages , but durable as well. If the Ardgowan Distillery intends to take visitors on tours of its distillery, it will also need to consider their safety, ensuring that they are properly separated from the working areas of the distillery and that walkways are clearly marked.

The Ardgowan Distillery is an opportunity for the Ardgowan Estate to resurrect a business that closed decades ago, after being destroyed by bombs during the second world war. The original Ardgowan Distillery was founded in Greenock in 1896 and produced grain spirit and industrial alcohol. 

Of course, the whisky coming out of this modern incarnation will be of a much higher quality than the grain spirit produced here originally, but it is a nice opportunity to bring this old business back to life.

Meanwhile, another Scottish drinks producer has announced that it will be offering one of its much-loved brews in a bottled version, in addition to the casks it already sells.

Off Licence News revealed that Orkney Brewery will now be bottling its popular Puffin Ale, which has been available in casks for two years.

Managing director of Sinclair Breweries, which is behind the Puffin Ale, Norman Sinclair told the news provider that they were surprised by the popularity of the ale on a national scale. He added that customers have been asking for a bottled version since the ale first launched and the company is “very excited to now be bringing one to the market”.

Mr Sinclair went on to thank the company’s customers for their support and feedback, adding that it is this that has resulted in Puffin Ale being made available in a bottled version.

“We’d like to say thanks to everyone who took the trouble to let us know how much they loved the original cask variety,” he stated.

By Donna Clayton 02 Mar, 2017

With more and more microbreweries opening around the UK, we thought it would be a good idea to highlight some of the most common health and safety issues faced in this environment, and how best to tackle them.

According to the Health & Safety Executive (HSE), there are a number of things that can cause injury to staff in a brewery.

Top of the list is manual handling. Lifting heavy barrels and crates is often the cause of injuries, so it’s vital that all your staff are trained in proper manual handling techniques from day one of working with you.

As well as teaching them how to lift correctly on their own, make sure they understand that certain items shouldn’t be moved without assistance from at least one other person.

Next up is slips and trips, which is no surprise given that you’re in an environment where things can be spilled, and there could be obstructions on the floor. In fact, the HSE points out that around half of the injuries in this category are caused by slips, and of those 90% occur on wet floors.

That’s a big incentive to make sure any spills are dealt with quickly and effectively, but also to minimise the chances of slips occurring by installing the right kind of flooring. You won’t prevent every incident, but having durable, non-slip flooring is a must.

Resin flooring is a good option for breweries, because it has non-slip properties, is durable and can deal with chemical spillages as well as heavy items being moved around.

Of course, making sure that all your staff know the procedure for dealing with a spillage is also vital, as is having all the correct equipment on hand to ensure this is done quickly.

When it comes to trips, a lot of it is to do with awareness - mostly making your staff aware that certain things, like trailing wires, can become a hazard to someone walking around the brewery floor.

It can be useful to mark out walkways on your resin flooring, which will give you clear areas where nothing should be left lying around. This is particularly important if you plan to run any brewery tours with members of the public.

Making sure they stay within a designated area is vital to ensure their safety, and it’s another incentive for your staff to keep the walkways clean, tidy and spillage free.

Similarly, any areas of your brewery where forklifts or powered trucks operate need to be clearly marked and also kept clear of obstructions. Injuries involving lift trucks also make the HSE list of main causes of injury in the brewing sector in the UK.

While your main priority will, of course, be keeping all your employees healthy and safe, there is a financial and business incentive to stay on top of your health and safety procedures.

Earlier this year the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health highlighted the growing number of large fines being handed out for health and safety violations. The organisation noted that there were 19 penalties over £1 million handed out in 2016, compared to just three in 2015.5
By Donna Clayton 21 Feb, 2017

The microbrewery sector in the UK certainly had a strong year in 2016, and it looks like it will be no different this year, with a host of new microbreweries and associated bars already announced.

Anyone in Swansea will be no doubt be pleased to hear about the future of the former angling centre at Pilot House Wharf, where a Welsh couple have now been granted planning permission to convert the ground floor into a microbrewery, with a craft beer bar on the first floor above, the South Wales Evening Post reported.

Richard and Jo Bennett are likely to be making plans to lay resin flooring for their microbrewery, as they get it ready to start crafting delicious beers. The couple certainly know what they’re doing on this front, having already started a highly successful pub and microbrewery in Mumbles.

The Pilot, which the Bennetts run with Rhys Pillai, will continue to operate as normal and the couple plan to use what they’ve learned from that venture to make their Swansea venue a success.

But Swansea isn’t the only UK town that will be getting a new microbrewery in the coming months, with the Stoke Sentinel revealing that a derelict brewery in the city is set to be brought back to life - and will brew beers inspired by Mustang cars.

The Mustang Sally, Mustang Gold and Mustang V8 brews will all soon be found in pubs around Stoke-on-Trent, with the three business partners behind the revamped brewery planning to stock the beers in their own bars.

Mark Aston, master brewer and one of the three men responsible for the project, told the newspaper that this is a dream that the three business partners behind the business have had for a while.

“We have wanted to open this as a brewery to produce our own good-quality beer for some time,” he stated. “It has taken time, but we are there and ready for our opening.”

Among the pubs that will be stocking the Mustang-themed brews are The Wheatsheaf, The Duke William and the Post Office Vaults.

 Dave Jones and Steve Sieradzki are the other two partners in the venture, with Dave explaining it was his idea to name their ales after the iconic Mustang car.

Earlier this year, plans for a microbrewery at White Hart Lane - Tottenham Hotspur’s ground - were unveiled, and will form part of the new ground that’s being constructed for the Premier League football club.

The microbrewery at the football club is expected to produce one million pints per year, and fans are expected to enjoy the option of drinking craft beer at their club on match days.

The Independent explained that the football club wanted to make a modern statement, while still retaining the more traditional atmosphere for fans.

With so many new breweries opening around the UK in the coming months, demand for durable resin flooring is sure to climb, as owners need to ensure their premises are properly fitted out to deal with the demands of brewing.

Resin flooring has many advantages in such a setting , including that it has anti-slip properties and is easy to clean.


More Posts
By Donna Clayton 20 Apr, 2017

They may have started as the industry underdogs, but ‘independent’ brewers Brewdog have built their empire from the heavy duty resin flooring up to be now worth upwards of £1 billion.

The brand’s roots grew from a perspective of the outsider of the brewery industry, choosing its signature brew names such as ‘Punk’ as a sign of defiance against the mainstream brewers, and after a hugely successful crowdfunding campaign which raised $102 million in the US, the brand began to blossom into the beers you can find stocked in almost every supermarket and the specialty pubs in every major city in the UK.

With the initial backers of the brand the very people who were drinking it, now, a major investment company have just bought a 22 per cent stake in the company, according to insider.co.uk , worth £213 million. That gives the business a value just topping £1 billion and is thought to have netted the co-founders £100 million in profit in the process.

For those initial backers, their original stakes in the business have not been diluted as such, and indeed are worth an astronomical amount more than when they bought them. In some cases, this has meant growth in the value of their shares by 2,700%.

Despite their success, the brand has been criticised for being a ‘corporate sellout’ - especially given the concept it sold to its original backers, leaving it in a somewhat uncomfortable position.

One of the founders, James Watt, told the BBC that the shift in ownership wouldn’t affect the brand’s core values : "Our appeal to drinkers isn't about scale, it's about passion and values. It's about living or dying by what goes in to every glass or bottle,” he said.

However, the brand has also been dogged by some other bad press, which have been decidedly less punk than their signature virtues would suggest of them. They had previously taken legal action against small pubs who had names that slightly infringed on their own brew names, as well as against one for a vodka drink it had yet to launch. It even challenged a bar which wanted to call itself ‘Draft Punk’, saying that it wanted intellectual property rights over the word ‘Punk’ in relation to beer.

Protecting the brand will undoubtedly be important for them, especially with copycats from more traditionally corporate brewers looking to emulate their successes, however, for its loyal followers, these were not the actions they wanted to see.

It’s a question which may crop up for any microbrewery who experiences success in the craft beer market. Buyers are purchasing not only a taste of your beer, but also the story of it - where it was made, the people it was made by and the values attached to it. Of course, when that initial situation changes, you may not be able to deliver this and still make your brewing a commercial business.

After all, that pretty new resin screed flooring isn’t going to pay for itself, is it?

By Donna Clayton 18 Apr, 2017

Tesco has announced a significant expansion of its craft beer range, including a sour beer - Tart Bakewell Beer from the Thornbridge brewery in Derbyshire.

And the supermarket giant has highlighted this particular tipple as the next big thing in the beer and ale sector.

Speaking about the growth in the retailer’s craft beer range, Tesco craft beer buyer Chloe Harrison revealed that sour beer is expected to become increasingly popular.

“We think sour brews are destined to become the next frontier for beer lovers, in the same way that golden ale helped convert diehard lager lovers over to light and refreshing ales,” she asserted. 

Ms Harrison added that there’s no sign that the craft beer trend in the UK is slowing down either, with the brews on offer appealing to such a wide demographic.

More than 70 lines of craft beer from all around the world will soon be made available in Tesco’s UK stores - an increase of almost one-third on the current range. 

If the supermarket giant is right, could we see more breweries experimenting with sour beers, or will it lead to a new wave of craft breweries being established around the country to provide this alternative tipple?

Sour beer is most commonly associated with Belgium and is brewed to have an intentionally tart or sour flavour. Earlier this year, the Independent picked out the ten best sour beers on the market, with just one - Siren, Calypso - coming from a UK-based brewer. 

If you’re looking at establishing your own brewery, make sure you set it up properly from the ground up with durable resin flooring. Contact us today to find out how we can help .

 

By Donna Clayton 13 Apr, 2017


Yorkshire’s Ossett Brewery is set for a significant expansion as the craft beer market continues to boom in the UK.

The brewery, which has been running since 1997, has already expanded once when it outgrew its original facility and moved to where it’s currently situated in Kings Yard.

However, now the popularity of its brews such as Excelsior and Silver King means the brewing company is ready to grow again. This time it will involve building a new cold storage warehouse, with a floor space of 12,000 sq ft.

The aim is to enable the brewery to move into packaged products as well as continuing to produce its popular range of cask beers.

Work on the new warehouse has already started and will no doubt involve laying resin flooring to provide a durable and safe working space .

It is set to open by the end of the year and Ossett Brewery will be recruiting new staff to help it expand its business. An additional 40 roles are set to be created over the coming three years, the brewery revealed.

There doesn’t seem to be any sign that the craft beer market in the UK is going to shrink. Last month research conducted by The Brewers Journal and Alltech found that the country has the most craft breweries per capita in the world.

According to the survey, there are 25 craft breweries per million people in the UK, compared to 16 in Germany and 15 in the US. That said, the US still wins on sheer numbers, boasting 4,750 craft breweries throughout the country.


More Posts
Share by: